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Why did #metoo hit the Nordics differently?

Why did #metoo hit the Nordics differently?

(Sep 16, 2019) Two years after the #metoo movement exploded in social media and became a global phenomenon, Iceland’s Prime Minister Katrín Jakobsdóttir will be hosting an international conference on the issue in Reykjavik from 17 to 19 September.

The Nordics, the EU and the climate

(Sep 12, 2019) New labour ministers have recently been appointed in three of the Nordic countries. In Finland and Denmark as a result of elections, in Sweden because the government nominated Ylva Johansson to a role as a new EU commissioner.

Timo Harakka’s challenge: to increase employment in Finland

Timo Harakka’s challenge: to increase employment in Finland

(Sep 12, 2019) Much is expected from the new Finnish Minister of Employment Timo Harakka. His background is unusual for a politician. The ministerial post came as a surprise to him too. As an MP he focused on the economy and the environment.

Peter Hummelgaard: aims to secure early retirement for tired workers

Peter Hummelgaard: aims to secure early retirement for tired workers

(Sep 12, 2019) The Danish labour market is facing major changes if Minister for Employment Peter Hummelgaard manages to get support for his plans. He wants to fight for fairer conditions for people with lower levels of education and for those in low-paid jobs.

What are the critical issues for Nordic trade unions?

What are the critical issues for Nordic trade unions?

(Sep 12, 2019) What goes on inside the head of a trade union leader? At the NFS congress in Malmö they were challenged to spend one minute to describe what they see as the greatest challenge going forward. Here are some of the answers:

Nordic trade unions: climate action must be fair

Nordic trade unions: climate action must be fair

(Sep 12, 2019) ”There are no jobs on a dead planet” was the most cited slogan at the Nordic trade unions’ congress in Malmö from 3 - 5 September. The climate issue is at the forefront of the trade union movement’s mind too.

Oslo Foodora riders on strike

Oslo Foodora riders on strike

(Sep 12, 2019) It has become an increasingly common sight in many cities: Foodora’s bike riders home-delivering restaurant food. But right now in Oslo, hundreds of striking riders are cycling around to gather support for their demand for a collective agreement. Other countries are taking note.

Alarm bells ring after many fatal workplace accidents in Sweden

Alarm bells ring after many fatal workplace accidents in Sweden

(Sep 12, 2019) Men working high up in construction and men loading and unloading trucks. Two risk-filled jobs that have claimed lives this year in Sweden. But the initial increase in fatal accidents earlier in 2019 has subsided.

Finnish safety training park makes workplace risks more visible

Finnish safety training park makes workplace risks more visible

(Sep 12, 2019) Everyone should return home in the evening. That is the motto for construction workers. But you need more than theoretical knowledge in order to eliminate the risks of accidents. Like bringing routines closer to people’s hearts. A visit to a safety training park speeds things up.

New technology leads to growing polarisation in the labour market

New technology leads to growing polarisation in the labour market

(Sep 12, 2019) Skilled jobs are on the rise both in the Nordic countries and elsewhere in the OECD, while routine jobs disappear. The challenge now is to help more people to develop their skills and to expand social security support to include those without permanent employment.

Wages are not everything – national insurance costs important to posting of workers

(Sep 12, 2019) A Lithuanian construction worker posted to Sweden does have the right to be paid according to the Swedish Byggavtalet – the collective agreement between the Swedish Construction Federation and the Swedish Building Workers' Union – but he or she most often will not be able to keep as much of the money as a locally employed colleague on the same pay. Because the Lithuanian worker must normally pay part of the statutory national insurance contribution in his or her native country.

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