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You are here: Home i In Focus i In focus 2011 i Crises test the strength of the Nordic welfare models

Crises test the strength of the Nordic welfare models

Nordic countries have been exposed to great challenges lately. The economic crisis hit Iceland like a hurricane, the political power balance in Finland ended up being radically different after the 22 June election and one month later Norway suffered its worst terror attack since World War two. But the challenges also demonstrate the Nordic welfare society’s strength. In Oslo 200,000 people took to the streets carrying roses for democracy. In Iceland politicians put social equality first in the wake of the economic collapse. Do we need a “tailored welfare model” to avoid differences between the countries growing too large? asks Bjørn Hvinden who heads up a Nordic research programme looking at the welfare models.
Welfare model put to the test

Welfare model put to the test

The Nordic countries worked their way through the 2008 financial crisis. The welfare model largely shared by the five countries proved effective. Now the world economy is on shaky ground yet again. Can the Nordic model still be a third way between the more brutal Anglo-Saxon model and the lack of state financial control seen in many Mediterranean countries?

Welfare model put to the test - Read More…

Equality driver of Iceland’s success

Equality driver of Iceland’s success

Higher taxes for those who have the most, protection of the poor and debt relief to businesses and households - all part of the recipe to get a bankrupt state back on track according to the Icelandic experience. You also need a proper post-party tidy-up, get the economy in balance and prevent criminal activity from repeating itself.

Equality driver of Iceland’s success - Read More…

An election coloured by crisis

An election coloured by crisis

Which politicians can best guide Denmark through the current economic crisis, where more and more Danes fear going bust or end up unemployed? That is the deciding question in the Danish elections this month.

An election coloured by crisis - Read More…

Populists govern in opposition

Populists govern in opposition

Support for Finland’s populist True Finns Party has grown after the spring parliamentary elections. It means the new government is forced to take into account the factors behind the party’s growth, and first and foremost their demand for more expansive social policies to support the weakest in society.

Populists govern in opposition - Read More…

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