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Inclusion

Articles on inclusion.

Editorial: The inequality pain threshold has been reached

(Jun 22, 2017) The inequality pain threshold has been reached. The OECD now wants the world to think again about what the term economic growth should entail. So far the narrative about growth first, then distribution has only widened the gap between rich and poor. Now a new narrative is emerging, with terms like ‘resilient, sustainable and inclusive growth’. The Nordic Labour Journal looks into what this paradigm shift means and focuses on inclusion in the labour market.

Challenging globalisation’s winners: The OECD wants to bridge the divides

Challenging globalisation’s winners: The OECD wants to bridge the divides

(Jun 22, 2017) The OECD’s Stefano Scarpetta calls the new narrative a paradigm shift. We must change the ideas which have created an increasing gap between rich and poor, says Secretary-General Angel Gurría: Economic growth is not enough, we need a new vision for inclusive and sustainable development. The social dimension broke through clearly at the OECD Forum 2017.

The Nordic region wants more refugees in work

The Nordic region wants more refugees in work

(Jun 22, 2017) The Nordic countries are leading the way when it comes to the inclusion of refugees, says the OECD’s Thomas Liebig. He holds up the unique structural introduction programmes as one example. The problem is that not many find work after finishing the programme. Norway’s Minister of Labour Anniken Hauglie wants to improve the way the measure is targeted in order to get refugees into the labour market.

Everybody wants to know about refugees’ skills

Everybody wants to know about refugees’ skills

(Jun 22, 2017) While the Nordic countries tightened border controls and made it harder for refugees to seek asylum, they also changed their policies to help refugees get quicker access to the labour market. In Norway the asylum seekers can now register their skills by themselves.

Polish immigrants in Norway – with only one foot in the labour market

Polish immigrants in Norway – with only one foot in the labour market

(Jun 22, 2017) Polish labour immigrants travelled to Norway rather than to Sweden or Denmark, which were closer, when Poland joined the EU in 2004. Most did not intend to stay, but after some years their families joined them in Norway. Because of short work contracts, the immigrants are in a kind of limbo. They have a job, but little prospect of promotion.

Grete Brochmann on refugee policies: Nordics more coordinated now

Grete Brochmann on refugee policies: Nordics more coordinated now

(Jun 22, 2017) The Nordic countries are more coordinated now than they were during the major influx of refugees in 2015, believes Grete Brochmann. She has led the two latest inquiries into immigration to Norway.

Refugee immigration not primarily about money

(Jun 22, 2017) What do refugees cost? It is a concern for both proponents and opponents of welcoming refugees to a country. Yet research shows the challenge is more social than economic, where the major risk of alienation lies in the gap between those who have a job and those who do not.

What does a stint in jail mean for getting a job?

What does a stint in jail mean for getting a job?

(Jun 22, 2017) A new study compares employment of previous inmates in four Nordic countries up until five years after their release. The aim has been to see whether former inmates in certain countries are more successful in finding work, and whether this is a result of the work of the correctional services or labour market measures.

How Danish municipalities are creating meaningful inclusion

How Danish municipalities are creating meaningful inclusion

(Jun 21, 2017) Danish municipalities are in the vanguard when jobs are created for people who are far removed from the labour market. Their experience shows all employees can benefit if the inclusion is done right.

Labour market inclusion more important than learning Finnish

Labour market inclusion more important than learning Finnish

(Jun 21, 2017) Why should it take seven years for immigrants to get nothing more than low-paid work, when there are expensive labour market measures in place? When can they get a well-paid job in the private sector after just one year!

Luca Visentin: The OECD must follow up its new narrative of inclusive growth

Luca Visentin: The OECD must follow up its new narrative of inclusive growth

(Jun 21, 2017) The European Trade Union Confederation, ETUC, criticises what they see as poor correlation between the OECD's macro-economic analysis and the strategic recommendations given to individual member countries. The advice does not reflect a new narrative about inclusive growth.

The Nordic region not good enough on gender equality and mental health

(Mar 06, 2017) There has been no overall change in the distribution of powerful positions in the Nordic region, according to the NLJ’s gender equality barometer for 2017. Yet there is an increase in the number of women in top positions within trade unions, employers’ organisations and labour government ministries.

Municipalities could be saved by newcomers

Municipalities could be saved by newcomers

(Feb 02, 2017) By 2030 Sweden’s countryside could have lost one third of its employable population compared to the year 2000, resulting in lost tax revenues, increased healthcare needs and a lack of labour. Many municipalities now put their hopes in the successful integration of newcomers. Krokom municipality is one of them.

Job prize to get more Danish long term unemployed into work

(Feb 02, 2017) A cash prize awaits Danes who get a job after a long time on unemployment benefits. Long term unemployment benefit receivers are also given help to find casual jobs. Yet one expert questions whether the economic incentive is large enough.

Nordic comparative report: Youths loosing their footing

Nordic comparative report: Youths loosing their footing

(Oct 22, 2015) The share of youths who loose their footing is increasing in all of the Nordic countries. Although youth unemployment is a major problem, decision makers should make a more concerted effort to identify and support those most at risk.

Experts propose a more labour targeted and user friendly NAV

Experts propose a more labour targeted and user friendly NAV

(Apr 15, 2015) One year has passed since Norway’s Minister of Labour and Social Affairs Robert Eriksson appointed the Expert group tasked with undertaking a comprehensive review of the Labour and Welfare Administration NAV under the motto ‘From bureaucratic reform to user reform’. Now the report is ready: ‘A NAV with possibilities.’

The Nordics: Failing reforms exclude youths with disabilities

(Mar 06, 2015) More flexibility does not lead to a more inclusive labour market. Political reforms carried out in the Nordic region in the first decade of the millennium do not have any measurable effects either, concludes the Nordic research group behind the report ‘New Policies to Promote Youth Inclusion’.

Norway: strike against labour law reform, tough conflicts ahead

Norway: strike against labour law reform, tough conflicts ahead

(Feb 07, 2015) Will more short term contracts lead to more jobs for more people? Will it make it easier to access the labour market? Would it create more jobs or just more temporary staff? These questions are at the core of Norwegian workers’ fight against changes to the working environment act.

Denmark: more refugees and immigrants into work

(Feb 07, 2015) Far too few refugees and immigrants in Denmark are in work, and there is broad agreement something needs to be done about it. Yet there is little support for the Prime Minister’s proposal to get refugees and immigrants to clean up Denmark’s beaches and fix swings in kindergartens.

Who can come, who can stay and who deserves a worthy life?

(Feb 11, 2014) Sweden is a strong proponent for a generous and open immigration policy. The differences between the Nordic countries become clear. Minister for Integration Erik Ullenhag stands out when he talks to the Nordic Labour Journal and warns against what he sees to be developing in several European countries — anti-immigrant parties on the rise and a general move towards stricter and more immigrant-critical policies. Nevertheless, new measures for better integration is being promoted by many.

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