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The Nordic model marries growth and equality

The Nordic model marries growth and equality

(Sep 13, 2012) For five years now the Nordic model has been the subject of a study which aims to establish whether the model can manage to modernise. A conference in Oslo at the end of August marked the end of REASSESS, where 80 reports and five books were presented over two intensive days.

Editorial: The good life as a centenarian

(Feb 09, 2012) The good life as a centenarian is so far reserved for the very few, but this year the first post war generation turns 67. This is a watershed. Already in 2017 there will be fewer people in work than outside of work. Active ageing has never been more relevant.

Active old age and solidarity between generations

Active old age and solidarity between generations

(Feb 09, 2012) Never before has so many lived for so long and been so healthy into such old age. In a few years there will be far more centenarians and people who will live for 20 to 30 years past their retirement age. Is Europe ready?

Young, middle-aged or old?

Young, middle-aged or old?

(Feb 09, 2012) How old do you have to be to be considered old? What constitutes as old varies a lot between different European countries. That is also true for how countries react to the demographic development: Generally very few people think it is necessary to increase the retirement age during the coming two decades, according to the ‘Special Eurobarometer 378 Active Ageing’.

Editorial: Equality means sustainability

(Sep 07, 2011) Economic crisis, political earthquakes and unprecedented terror in the midst of the Nordic region. It has all impacted the Nordic countries. “Crisis test the strength of the Nordic welfare models” is this month’s Theme. One important question pops up: must the welfare models be adapted to avoid growing differences within the countries?

Iceland’s Gudbjartur Hannesson puts people’s welfare first during the crisis

Iceland’s Gudbjartur Hannesson puts people’s welfare first during the crisis

(Sep 07, 2011) We have learnt that a state welfare system is immensely important and a prerequisite for a healthy working life, says Island’s Minister for Welfare Gudbjartur Hannesson. That is why protecting our welfare system has been given top priority during the crisis.

Welfare model put to the test

Welfare model put to the test

(Sep 07, 2011) The Nordic countries worked their way through the 2008 financial crisis. The welfare model largely shared by the five countries proved effective. Now the world economy is on shaky ground yet again. Can the Nordic model still be a third way between the more brutal Anglo-Saxon model and the lack of state financial control seen in many Mediterranean countries?

Equality driver of Iceland’s success

Equality driver of Iceland’s success

(Sep 07, 2011) Higher taxes for those who have the most, protection of the poor and debt relief to businesses and households - all part of the recipe to get a bankrupt state back on track according to the Icelandic experience. You also need a proper post-party tidy-up, get the economy in balance and prevent criminal activity from repeating itself.

An election coloured by crisis

An election coloured by crisis

(Sep 07, 2011) Which politicians can best guide Denmark through the current economic crisis, where more and more Danes fear going bust or end up unemployed? That is the deciding question in the Danish elections this month.

Populists govern in opposition

Populists govern in opposition

(Sep 07, 2011) Support for Finland’s populist True Finns Party has grown after the spring parliamentary elections. It means the new government is forced to take into account the factors behind the party’s growth, and first and foremost their demand for more expansive social policies to support the weakest in society.

Nordic working group to suggest how to remove border obstacles

(Jun 17, 2011) A Nordic working group has been commissioned to present solutions for how to remove 39 border obstacles identified as being to the detriment of working life and social insurance systems in the Nordic countries. The group's chairperson is Essi Rentola. She estimates between a third and half of all the obstacles need to be solved on an EU level because they affect the entire Union and not only the Nordic countries.

Challenge to Finland's health sector "not due to lack of resources”

Challenge to Finland's health sector "not due to lack of resources”

(Mar 07, 2011) Finland's health and social care sector is facing major challenges. But this is not about a lack of resources. Systems and processes need an overhaul to allow doctors and nurses to work with what they have been trained for: to take care of people, Finland's Minister of Social Affairs and Health Juha Rehula tells Nordic Labour Journal.

Hanne Bjurstrøm: Norway's new Minister of Labour with a vision

Hanne Bjurstrøm: Norway's new Minister of Labour with a vision

(May 05, 2010) Norway's new Minister of Labour, Hanne Bjurstrøm, wants to sort out the Norwegian Labour and Welfare Administration, find efficient systems to deal with social dumping and help more people with reduced work capacity. Her vision: to help anyone who is able to do some work get out of being passive recipients of state support. To do that she needs the support of companies.

The spirit of Iceland - Big cars and Big Spenders

The spirit of Iceland - Big cars and Big Spenders

(Oct 01, 2002) Iceland is a large country with a population of 286,000 people, 180,000 of whom live in the Reykjavik region. Roughly the same size as Ireland, it is very sparsely populated, with only 3 persons per square kilometre. The statistics are remarkable. Iceland stands out among the Nordic countries. It is the country with the highest employment rate (for women too), the lowest unemployment rate, the highest working age, the longest life expectancy, the highest birth rate and the lowest sick leave rates. Why is that? Where's the magic?

The labyrinth of maternity leave benefits

(Oct 01, 2002) For the past two years in a row, the UN Development Programme has awarded Norway the best place to live in the world based on its quality of life index. With 10-12 months paid maternity leave, free prenatal care and delivery, and extra child care benefits once the baby is born, who could argue. I can see now why so many twentysomethings in Norway with no job, nor perhaps a steady partner, take the plunge into motherhood without so much as a blink. Heck, you can even become crown princess of Norway.

The labyrinth of maternity leave benefits

The labyrinth of maternity leave benefits

(Oct 01, 2002) For the past two years in a row, the UN Development Programme has awarded Norway the best place to live in the world based on its quality of life index. With 10-12 months paid maternity leave, free prenatal care and delivery, and extra child care benefits once the baby is born, who could argue.

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Welfare in Scandinavian

Danish: velfærd

Norwegian: velferd

Swedish: välfärd

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